Lab Profile

A newborn tammar. The fingertip behind gives a size reference.

A newborn tammar. The fingertip behind gives a size reference.

Our research covers a wide range of questions in reproductive and developmental biology, using physiological, endocrine, molecular, genetic and comparative genomic techniques. We have a strong research output including over 70 publications in the last 5 years, with papers in leading journals such as Nature, Nature Genetics, PLoS One, PLoS Biology and PNAS. We have just published the genome of the tammar wallaby in Genome Biology that will underpin all the studies outlined below.

The Reproduction and Development laborat­ory is well equipped and students gain training in a broad range of relevant, cutting edge techniques in molecular biology, endocrinology, physiology and anatomy that will enhance future career prospects. We can take Honours, Masters and PhD students.

Research Projects

Funding

Publications    Journal Cover Pages designed and contributed by the lab

Collaborators and Industry Links

Recent News / Blog entries

  • Prettier graphs using Excel
    Excel excels at ugly graphs, However it can produce nice graphs if you know how. It takes a little thought, and a little effort to transform the default graphs, setting sizes, spacing, colours, fonts, formats, but once you are familiar, it takes little time, and once you have a nice format you can even re-use the graph format in different projects - all you need to do is point it to different data sets.
  • New Wallavan
    gs-2016-11-08-g5d35215At last we have our new wallavan. Overlanda have done a fine job. We were impressed by the wallaby stencil on the sides.
  • On the principle of "Maximum Author Load" ...
    I came across a publication today with almost 2500 authors. It must have been a nightmare to coordinate all their comments on the draft manuscript!
  • Reproduction Down Under 2017
  • Colourblindness and graphicscolour-blind-examples-06
    About one in ten males (including myself) have some degree of red-green colour blindness (and 0.5% of females), so you should bear that in mind when you are making graphics to display to others. Here are some suggestions for making colour-blindness friendly graphics.

Recent Reproduction Literature